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Opening Your Throat Chakra and Finding Your Voice Through Song #TruthbyBrenda

Finding Your Voice, Identity / Being Who You Are | 0 comments

We’ve all experienced a lump in the throat when we want to cry but don’t feel comfortable to let the tears flow. Many women have told me this happens when they are about to sing. Some describe it as feeling like the song or their voice is stuck in their throat.

When you first start singing indigenous healing songs, it’s all about release, and retrieving your spirit. At some point, you will hear your voice sound clear like a bell and you’ll hear power in your voice that came without effort. That’s what I call singing yourself alive!

I’ve been gifted with the ability to open that up in women. That’s why some people cry when I sing. When someone tells me they cried from my singing, I say that’s good. That means they allowed that connection to Source that we need to be able to sing from a place of spiritual connection. The purer you can make that connection, the more you can connect with your own voice and let that out.

Imagine – where does that lump go if you do not release the tears?

That lump in the throat is saved pain, rooted in old trauma most often and added to by further trauma later in life. So once a woman starts using her voice to sing or speak her truth, that is a huge step toward further connection with her own body, mind and spirit, and singing starts to heal the pain, whether she is conscious of it or not.

The vocal chords are muscles, and so the more you use them, the easier it gets. Also, once you are less tense or nervous about singing, the body will relax, which helps the breathing… and the breath is where the power is. That’s why the words spirit and breath or wind are almost the same in some of our indigenous languages.

Singing has a lot to do with breathing. We live in such a fast-paced, high pressure society that we often are tightened up to the point of barely breathing. We need to re-learn how to breathe and release tension because we are so used to living with it that stress seems normal to us.

It’s very powerful to let yourself be a vessel for Source energy, and truly finding your voice through sacred singing brings that gift with it. Once tears are allowed to come and really move through the body, the physical feeling of having the song stuck in the throat will begin to melt away.

Joy and laughter will begin to replace the pain. It’s really hard for us women to use our voices in sacred song because it opens up vulnerability. And it’s incredibly healing. I’ve seen women who never sang a word sing out and then have a giant smile on for hours or even days afterward.

You can do it. Anyone can sing. Your voice is beautiful. Mother Earth is waiting to hear your song.

Thanks & Blessings to you.

Brenda MacIntyre – Medicine Song Woman

If you’ve enjoyed this #TruthbyBrenda article, you can go get your free Find Your Voice Gift Pack, and a subscription to my #TruthbyBrenda Soundbytes, videos and ezine at MedicineSongWoman.com. I’m Brenda MacIntyre, Medicine Song Woman. Blessings of sweet success to you. Until next time, or as we say in the Ojibwe language, ba ma pii.

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About Brenda MacIntyre

About Brenda MacIntyre

Known by her indigenous name Medicine Song Woman, Brenda MacIntyre has shared her evocative melodic voice and fusion of reggae, rap and indigenous hand drum healing music with appreciative audiences of 30 to 3,000 across North America. The Toronto-based Juno Award-winning singer has been featured nationally on MuchMusic, CTV, CP24, APTN and most recently, Global and the front page of the Toronto Star.

Powered by her grief from losing her son to murder in 2016, Brenda MacIntyre pours her soulful voice over a confluence of indigenous hand drum healing, soft rap and conscious roots reggae in her album “Picking Up the Pieces,” released in September 2019.

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